Standing Arrow Powwow celebrates 40 years

Print Article

  • LLOYD Irvine, pictured center wearing white with a matching vest and gloves, is vice president of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribal Council. He marched with other tribal leaders Friday during the 40th Elmo Powwow, which celebrates culture. (Ashley Fox/Lake County Leade)

  • 1

    BRILLIANTLY dressed tribal members of all ages participated in a Grand Entrance, a procession to a beat set by drummers Friday evening. (Ashley Fox/Lake County Leader)

  • LLOYD Irvine, pictured center wearing white with a matching vest and gloves, is vice president of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribal Council. He marched with other tribal leaders Friday during the 40th Elmo Powwow, which celebrates culture. (Ashley Fox/Lake County Leade)

  • 1

    BRILLIANTLY dressed tribal members of all ages participated in a Grand Entrance, a procession to a beat set by drummers Friday evening. (Ashley Fox/Lake County Leader)

A steady cadence was kept by drums Friday evening as the sun slowly began to set, marking the second night of the 40th annual Standing Arrow Powwow.

Held on July 13-16 at the Elmo Powwow Grounds on U.S. Highway 93, the gathering saw dancers, drummers, vendors and visitors from across the continent.

Lloyd Irvine, vice president of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribal Council, said that the powwow was a celebration for warriors in addition to tribal members celebrating culture, as he stood off to the side as the event began to take shape Friday evening.

Tribal members of all ages wore traditional garb, competing for a prize of $200, Irvine said. The grand entrance, a parade of members entering the pavilion, started just before 8 p.m. with a prayer that was not allowed to be photographed or video recorded.

To show respect, everyone in the stands was asked to stand and remove hats without feathers while the prayers were sung.

Dressed in a beige-colored leather vest with beaded adornment, Irvine said the Elmo powwow is unlike others in the circuit as organizers keep the celebration smaller and “intimate.”

During the powwow, bands made up of multiple drummers provided the music for the procession, lead by tribal leaders.

Surrounding the large wooden pavilion that Irvine said was constructed about 12 years ago are campgrounds. In the future, Irvine said that it is a goal to have an area for recreational vehicles overlooking the lake. Families pitched tents and some stayed in tipis and campers during the weekend celebration.

There are approximately 8,000 enrolled tribal members, Irvine said.

Print Article

Read More

Pirates experience subtle changes in Danley era

August 17, 2017 at 2:56 pm | Lake County Leader Change is inevitable when a new football coach takes over a program and for the Polson football program change is gradual but evident as the Pirates enter their first season under coach Pat Danley. ...

Comments

Read More

Pirates golfers aim for another state bid in 2017 season

August 17, 2017 at 2:55 pm | Lake County Leader When Polson High School golf coach Bill Owen glanced at his preliminary boys’ roster, he said he couldn’t help but have a sense of preseason optimism. The Pirates, who are coming off a second place ...

Comments

Read More

Lady Pirates golf gets ready for season

August 17, 2017 at 2:55 pm | Lake County Leader The Polson Lady Pirates’ team will be young and is still looking to fill out its roster from a team that finished fifth in the 2016 state competition. The three returners from last year’s state...

Comments

Read More

Bulldogs football prepares for season in new conference

August 17, 2017 at 2:54 pm | Lake County Leader ST. IGNATIUS — Mission High School player Troy Mitchell not only survived last season but the now senior utilized last season’s struggles as a catalyst to motivate he and his team to have a successf...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(406) 883-4343
PO BOX 1090
Polson, MT 59860

©2017 Lake County Leader Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X